Jung Hong Park featured in Art Aurea

Jung Hong Park featured in “Drawing on Ample Resources. Seven Cross-Cultural Dialogs”, a keynote topic of Art Aurea 1-2016 issue.

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<Fine Colorful Lines>
Jung Hong Park’s contemporary white porcelains sustain and revive the craftsmanship of traditional beakja (Korean white porcelain) of Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910), known for its pure and subdued white tone and elegant form. He also uses a special technique called sang-gam (inlay work), a prominent technique used for cheongja (Korean celadon) of Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392), to create his signature lines on his white porcelain; he first carves into the ceramic, using diamond blade, to create extremely thin lines and paints over the whole object, and finally sands off a very thin surface layer so the color-inlaid lines appear. Then he polishes the whole object again to create smooth, pebble-like texture. A connection can be also drawn between the simple geometric forms and precise lines of Park’s objects and Minimalism; the inlaid lines accentuate the silhouettes of the forms, just like Frank Stella’s lines echo the literal shape of picture support. Lastly, there is an element of Op art; subtle changes and gradation in color of the lines within one object, as well as among a series of works, create an illusionary undulation.